Eliza Haywood

Anti-Pamela; or Feign’d Innocence Detected

Published by Good Press, 2021
goodpress@okpublishing.info
EAN 4064066458096

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ANTI-PAMELA: OR, Feign'd Innocence DETECTED; In a SERIES of SYRENA's ADVENTURES.
Anti-Pamela, OR, MOCK-MODESTY Display'd and Punish'd.
THURSDAY Afternoon.
MONDAY Morning.
MONDAY Afternoon.
WEDNESDAY Morning.
Thursday Morning.
FRIDAY Noon.
FRIDAY.
MONDAY.
WEDNESDAY.
THURSDAY Evening.
Friday Morning.
MONDAY Morning.
WEDNESDAY Afternoon.
SATURDAY Morning, Eight o'Clock.
LETTER I.
LETTER II.
LETTER III.
To Miss Maria S--, at Mrs. J--'s House in Lincolnshire.
LETTER I.
LETTER II.
LETTER III.
LETTER IV.
FRIDAY.
LETTER V.
LETTER VI.
LETTER VII.

ANTI-PAMELA: OR, Feign'd Innocence DETECTED; In a SERIES of SYRENA's ADVENTURES.

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A Narrative which has really its Foundation in Truth and Nature; and at the same time that it entertains, by a vast variety of surprising Incidents, arms against a partial Credulity, by shewing the Mischiefs that frequently arise from a too sudden Admiration.

Publish'd as a necessary Caution to all Young Gentlemen.

LONDON: Printed for F. Huggonson, in Sword-and-Buckler-Court, over against the Crown-Tavern on Ludgate-Hill . M.DCC.XLI.


Anti-Pamela, OR, MOCK-MODESTY Display'd and Punish'd.

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Syrena was a Girl, who even in her Cradle gave the promise of being one of the compleatest Beauties of the Age: As her Years encreas'd, and her Features grew more settled, her Loveliness encreased in Proportion; but what was most to be admired in her was, that the Innocence which is inseparable from Infancy, and which is so charming, even in the plainest Children, never forsook her Countenance; but continued to dwell in every little Turn and Gesture long after she came to Maturity, and had been guilty of Things, which one would think should have given her the boldest and most audacious Air.

Her Mother, though in very mean Circumcumstances, when she was born, flatter'd herself with great Things, from the growing Beauties of her sweet Babe; and tho' she had other Children, this alone engross'd her whole Attention: I say her Mother, for her Father, at least him, whom the Law would have obliged to own her, died soon after she came into the World; and was incapable of receiving any share either in the Profits or Disgrace of our little Syrena's future Conduct.

Being therefore left entirely to the Care of a Parent, who had been a Woman of Intrigue in her Youth, was far from repenting what she had done; and one of the most subtil Mistresses in the Art of Decoying that ever was; the Girl was not out of her Bib and Apron, before she instructed her in Lessons, which she had the wicked Satisfaction to find, her Pupil knew not only how to observe, but also to improve.

She had not reach'd her thirteenth Year, before she excell'd the most experienc'd Actresses on the Stage, in a lively assuming all the different Passions that find Entrance in a Female Mind. Her young Heart affected with imaginary Accidents (such as her Mother, from time to time, suggested to her might possibly happen) gave her whole Frame, Agitations adapted to the Occasion, her Colour would come and go, her Eyes sparkle, grow Languid, or overflow with Tears, her Bosom heave, her Limbs tremble; she would fall into Faintings, or appear transported, and as it were out of herself; and all this so natural, that had the whole College of Phycians been present, they could not have imagin'd it otherwise than real.

Thus was she train'd up to deceive and betray all those whom her Beauty should allure; but she had not so soon as she wish'd an Opportunity of discovering how well she should behave, when what had yet only been Ideal, should come to be real Matter of Fact; for being very little of her Age, the Men took no farther Notice of her, than to say she was an exceeding pretty Miss--a very fine Girl-- that she'd soon be a delicate Creature, and such like Compliments, that were nothing to the Purpose at present.

About this Time several of her Mother's Relations, as she had some that lived well, and in good Repute; knowing the Indigence of their Condition, and that they were obliged frequently to have recouese to them, for even the common Necessaries of Life; began to ask what was intended to be done with Syrena, for the other Children were all taken away by the Friends of one side or the other; to which finding no determinate Answer, they advised the Mother, to put her to a Milliner or Mantua-maker, tho' the latter they seem'd to think most proper; not only because there required no Stock to set up, with, when her Apprenticeship should be expired but because also they thought that in that Business, having to deal only with Persons of her own Sex, she would be exempt from those Temptations, her Youth and Beauty might expose her to in the Millinary Way. One of these Gentlewomen was so good, as to promise she would give Fifteen or Twenty Pounds with her to a Mistress she should approve. The Mother durst not refuse so kind an Offer, and assured her generous Kinswoman she would enquire about it; but as this was not the manner in which she desired to dispose of Syrena, she still found excuses to evade the Matter, and pretended she could not hear of any fit Place.

As there seem'd no room to suspect the Truth of what she said, or that a Parent would not be glad her Child should be in a way of getting a handsome Living; this truly honest and worthy Friend, took upon herself the trouble of looking out for a Mistress, and in a short time was inform'd of one who had very great Business, and was a Woman of a sober and unblemish'd Character. The Mother of Syrena had no Objections to make, the Terms between them was soon agreed upon, and the Girl was to go one Month upon Trial; after which the Indenture was to be made, and the Money paid by the good Gentlewoman, who had taken all this Pains, out of a conscientious regard for the Preservation of a young Creature, who she thought deserv'd it; and who might otherwise be drawn into those Snares, too often laid for Youth and Innocence; especially where there is an Indigence of Circumstances, and which a much better Education than could be expected the poor Syrena had been blest with, is not always a sufficient Guard again.

Syrena, who had always been sooth'd with the hopes of living grand, either by Marriage, or a Settlement from some Man of Condition, could not endure the Apprehension of sitting all Day to run Seams; nor was her Mother better pleased at this putting her Girl out of Fortune's way, as she call'd it; but as she resolv'd it should not be for any Continuance, she was the more easy, and made the other so too. Care was to be taken however not to disoblige their Benefactress, and they both affected the highest Gratitude to her, and Satisfaction in what, indeed, was most irksome to them.

Here one cannot forbear reflecting, how shocking it is, when those who should point out the Paths of Virtue, give a wrong Bent to the young and unform'd Mind, and turn the pliant Disposition to Desires unworthy of it; but more especially so in Parents, who seem ordain'd by Heaven and Nature, to instil the first Principles for the future Happiness of those to whom they have given Being; and tho' we cannot suppose there are many, who like the Mother of Syrena, breed their Children up with no other Intent than to make them the Slaves of Vice, yet if we look into the World, and consider the number of unfortunate Women (as they justly call themselves) I believe we shall find the Miseries these poor Creatures undergo, and frequently involve others in, less owing to their own Inclinations, than to the too great Indulgence and false Tenderness of their Parents; who flattering themselves that by breeding them like Gentlewomen, and setting them forth to the utmost of their Abilities, and often beyond, they shall be able to make their Fortune by Marriage; give them Ideas no way to their Advantage. What Compassion is due to a Mother, who having no Portion to give her Daughter, shall fill her Head with Notions of Quality; give Half a Crown for the cutting her Hair, when perhaps half the Money must serve the whole Family for a Dinner; make her wear Gloves, Night and Day, and scarce suffer her to wash a Tea-Cup for fear of spoiling her Hands; when such one, I say, shall cry out Daughter is undone, and exclaim against the cruel Man that has robb'd her of her Child; who can avoid accusing her as the first Seducer of the Girl's Virtue, by flattering that Pride and Vanity in her Nature, which without some extraordinary Providence, indeed, must render her an easy Prey to the first Temptation that offer'd itself. But as this is an Observation, that must occur to every thinking Person, I ought to beg my Reader's Pardon for the Digression, and return.

The Day prefix'd for the Departure of Syrena, the good-natur'd Kinswoman came and took her up in a Hackney-Coach with her Mother, who it was thought proper should go with her, and a Trunk with a few Cloaths in it; which the other looking over, told her, it should be better fill'd if she was a good Girl, and behaved herself well. I hope Madam, answer'd the young Dissembler, I shall never do any thing to forfeit the Favour of so kind, so generous a Relation; and if I could be capable of any Pride, it would be to carry myself so, that the Mistress I am going to, should give you such a Character of me, as would convince you I am not unworthy of your Favours. This Speech, accompanied with a thousand modest Graces, so charm'd the Person it was address'd to, that she took her in her Arms, and said, I have not the least doubt about me, that you will deserve much more Encouragement than is in my power to give; but, added she, you may be assur'd I will do all I can. Many such like Expressions of Kindness on the one side, and Gratitude on the other, pass'd between them till they got to the end of their little Journey, where they were very handsomely receiv'd and entertained by Syrena's intended Mistress; and our young Hypocrite so well acted her Part, affecting to be highly pleas'd with the Place and Person she was to be with, and testifying no farther Regret at parting from her Mother, than just so much as served to shew her Duty and Affection, that she was look'd upon as a Prodigy of Sweetness and Prudence.

Thus was she enter'd on a new Stage of Life; but in what Manner she was used, and her Behaviour in it, can be no way so well represented, as by her own Letters to her Mother; the first of which was wrote three Days after their Separation.


THURSDAY Afternoon.

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Dear Mamma, Tho' my Mistress has promised I shall go to see you next Sunday, if the Weather proves fair, I could not forbear writing to let you know how I go on. I assure you all here are very kind to me in their way. I lie with my Mistress's Sister, and breakfast and dine with them; for they say they see something in me that deserves better Treatment than any they have had before; but all this don't make me easy. I could not live as they do for the World; and I believe I shall find it a hard Matter to stay my Month out, they are such an old-fashion'd sanctify'd Family. --Ah, Mamma, what a difference between this and home! we rise every Morning at Eight o'Clock, have but one Hour allowed for Breakfast, and then to Work-- the same for Dinner, and then to Work again--no Tea in the Afternoon, unless Company comes--and then at Night, my Master who has a Place in the Stamp-Office, comes home about Nine; he and my Mistress and her Sister sit down to eat a bit; after that, I and the Maid, and an old Woman that has been a Nurse in the Family, are called into Prayers, and so to Bed -- This they call a sober regular Life--my Stars! defend me from such formal Ways-- I am quite sick of them already. I pretend, however, to be mighty well pleas'd, and do every thing they bid me with a great deal of Chearfulness, but it goes so against the Grain, that I know I can't do so long. Therefore, dear Mamma, remember your Promise, and contrive some Way to get me as soon as you can out of this Bondage, who am,

Your dutiful Daughter, Syrena Tricksy.

P. S. They don't know of my Writing, so I have no Compliments to send you.


MONDAY Morning.

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Dear Mamma, I Fretted myself almost sick that I could not come to you Yesterday; but you saw it rain'd incessantly--indeed I long to see you; and the more, because an Adventure has happened to me, which I don't know but may come to something, if I manage right-- I'll tell you exactly how it was, and then you will be the better able to advise me. --You must know, Mrs. Martin, my Mistress's Sister, and I, lie in a dark Closet, within the Dining-Room; so I go there as soon as I am up, to comb my Head and put on my Cap in the great Glass; but I am always in such a Hurry to get my things on before my Master and Mistress comes down, that I never minded who observed me. --I was observed however, and all my Motions watch'd, from the first Day I came it seems, as you shall hear --Last Friday some Silk being wanting for our Business, and the Maid sent out another Way, my Mistress bade me step for it: I ask'd if she had any particular Place where she bought. --Yes, said she, but that's too far off: for I generally buy a large Quantity together of a wholesale Dealer in the City, so you may go to the Haberdashers at the Corner of the Street, and get a Quarter of an Ounce for the present, but be sure you match the Colour; with these Words she gave me a bit of the Damask, and I said no more, but went on my Errand -- The Shop was very full of People when I came in, and among them a fine Gentleman with a lac'd Hat and Cockade, looking over some white Stockings--so I was oblig'd to wait till most of them were dispatch'd;--all the time I could see the Gentleman had his Eye upon me, and when all were gone besides ourselves and the Gentlewoman behind the Counter; How do you do, my pretty Neighbour, said he? Very well thank you, Sir, answered I, blushing and curtsying, as you bid me when any Stranger spoke to me, but I han't the Honour to know you--for that Matter, cry'd he, the Honour would be wholly on my side, if you had found any thing in me to take Notice of; but I assure you I lodge just over against you-- I was at my Window when you came out of a Hackney-Coach, accompanied by two grave Gentlewomen, who I suppose were your Relations; I saw too much of you then, not to wish to see more; and I can tell you the Pleasure of looking on you, while you are setting those pretty Locks of yours in Order, has made me an early Riser. As he spoke these Words, he took hold of my Hair as it hung down on my Neck, on which I frowned, and snatched away my Head---- I did not know that I had any Over-lookers, said I, but since I have, shall be more careful for the future; then I turned to the Woman of the Shop, and desired she would make haste to weigh me the Silk, for I could not stay. Nay, my sweet Miss, said he, you must not be angry,--I mean no Harm to you,--I have only a small Favour to beg of you, which you must not refuse me. All the Favours I can grant, answered I, must be small indeed. What I have to ask is such said he, it is no more than to chuse a Pair of Stockings; I am obliged to make a Present of a Pair to a young Relation in the Country, and would have your Fancy; --Pray let us see some of your best Womens Silk Stockings, added he, to the Woman; yes Sir, cry'd she, and immediately turn'd to reach a Parcel down. I have no Judgment, upon my Word, Sir, answered I, a little peevishly-- so pray Madam let me have the Silk. No, no, I bar that, cry'd he, first come, first serv'd, you know Miss is the Rule; and as I was here before you, I insist on having my Stockings before you have your Silk. I said nothing, but pretended to be mighty uneasy, tho' in my Heart I was well enough pleas'd.-- Well! the Stockings were brought, and he would have me chuse; so I pick'd out a pair of white with Pink Clocks, for there was none with Silver. He made me a Compliment on the Genteelness of my Fancy; and having paid for them, and two pair of fine Thread for himself, now, Miss, said he, you must accept of what you have made Choice of, and put them into my Hand with a Squeeze, that made my Fingers ake for an Hour after; --I was very much surprised I confess, not expecting any such thing, but I threw them down on the Counter, and told him, I never took any Presents from Gentlemen: He attempted to force them upon me again and again, but I would not take them all he could do; and there was a great Scuffle between us. At last finding I was resolute, he put them with the others into his Pocket, and went out of the Shop very much out of Humour. After he was gone, the Woman of the Shop began to banter me, and told me, I had made a Conquest; but I seemed to think nothing of it, and went away as soon as I had got my Silk. I prevented my Mistress from asking why I staid so long, by telling her, the Shop was so full of Customers, that I could not get served, at which she seemed not at all surprised. When I began to consider on what had pass'd; I thought I had been a little too rough in the latter part of my Behaviour; for tho' I did not repent my having refused the Stockings (tho' indeed they were very pretty) yet I did, that I had not done it with more Complaisance. --I verily believed he loved me; but then, as it was a Passion of so late a Date, it might want a little Hope to give it Strength; and tho' it was necessary I should seem coy, yet it should have been such a Coyness, as might give him room to fancy I might at last be won; and so have drawn him in by Degrees, till it was not in his power to go back. These Reflections kept me awake all Night, and when Morning came, I dress'd me at the usual Place; but that I might not seem too forward, I put the Window-Shutters a-jar, so that I could see him through the Crack, without his distinguishing me. --I was glad to find he was at his Post, because it look'd as if he had not given over all Thoughts of me;--I wanted to shew myself to him too, but could not tell how to do it, without making him think I did it on Purpose. --At last I bethought me of our Cutting-Room, which is over the Dining-Room;--I ran up there, and finding the Window open, stood some time; but he not expecting me so high, never lifted up his Eyes; so I took a Bottle with some Mint growing in it, and threw it into the Street; the Clash made him look up; he seem'd pleas'd to find there what he had so long been looking for in another Place, and kiss'd his Hand with a great deal of Gallantry and Tenderness; I seem'd confus'd, but made a Bow, and soon after retir'd. --I saw him no more that Day, but Yesterday and this Morning we have exchanged Glances several times thro' the Glass. --Dear Mamma, I am impatient to know if I have behaved hitherto as I should, and how I shall proceed for the future; for I am certain by all his Ways he loves me, and that something may be made of him, for he must be rich; he goes as fine as any Lord, and has a Man that waits upon him: So pray write your Mind with all Speed, and send it by old Sarah; but don't let her give it me before any of the Family, for fear they should expect me to shew it them; but she may come as with a Compliment from you to them, and to know how I do:-- So dear Mamma, no more at present, but that I am

Your most dutiful Daughter, Syrena Tricksy.


MONDAY Afternoon.

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Dear Mamma, As I was coming from putting my Letter to you, into the Post-house; who should I see in the middle of our Street, but my Lover, (for I think I may venture to call him so now) talking to another fine Gentleman-- I found he saw me, and it presently came into my Head to make tryal of his Love; so instead of going home, I turn'd down a little Court, I don't know the Name of it, but it goes into Covent-Garden, and walk'd slow. I had not gone many paces before I heard somebody come very fast behind me, I did not doubt but it was my Gentleman; and so indeed it proved; for having overtaken me, so my little cruel Dear, said he, taking hold of my Shoulder, have I caught you abroad once more. --I pretended a great Fright and Confusion, and desired him to take his Hand away; not without you'll tell me where you are going, and permit me to accompany you said he. Lord, Sir, cry'd I, trembling, I am only going to--to--where my Dear, again demanded He? Only to Covent-Garden, answered I, for a little Fruit. Well, said he, and where's the mighty Business if I go and buy a little Fruit too--I beg'd he would not--told him we should be taken notice of--and said all I could, but he swore he would go with me, and go with me he did. --When we came among the Stalls he would needs fill my Pockets with the best the Market afforded; I would have paid for them, but he would not let me, and I thought it would be carrying the thing too far, to make a bustle in that publick Place; so I thank'd him, and was going to take my leave-- No, said he, since Opportunities of speaking to you are so scarce, I am resolv'd you shan't quit me now, till you have heard what I have to say; and with these Words took hold of my Hand, and attempted to pull me into the Tavern, at the End of the Piazza. --I was frighted now in good earnest; and snatching my Hand away with more Strength than could be expected from me; what do you mean, Sir, said I, what do you take me for? For every thing that's charming, answered he --By Heaven! I would rather die than offer any thing should give you cause of Offence; therefore, dear Angel, oblige me so far, as to go in for one Quarter of an Hour only. Not for a Minute, cried I, I would not set my Foot in a nasty Tavern for the World. Fie, fie, said he, I shall suspect you for a little Prude if you talk at this rate, and look'd I thought as if he took me to be silly. I don't care what you suspect me for, answered I, and turn'd away as if I was going home; but he came after me, and beg'd that since I would not go into a Tavern, I would take a little walk with him in the Church-Yard, just to let him tell me something. This I was not averse to in my Mind, for I long'd to hear what he had to say, and so after some seeming Reluctance I comply'd. --Dear Mamma, 'tis impossible for me to repeat the fine Things he said to me, and much more to express the Tenderness with which he spoke them. He swore that his Intentions were perfectly honourable, that his Heart told him the first Moment he saw my Face, that I was the Person that must make him happy or miserable for ever--that he could not live without me, and that if he had Millions he would lay them at my Feet; and sigh'd at every word as if his Heart were breaking--I reply'd very little to all this, and seemed to think him not in earnest; but then he swore a Thousand Oaths, and offer'd to give me any proof I ask'd, tho' 'twere his Life. --Indeed Mamma, I never read more moving Things in a Play, but I did not seem to believe him for all that, and was for hurrying away; but he would not let me go till I had promised to meet him on Wednesday at the same Place --So pray let me have your Advice before then, whither I shall keep my word or not, and how I shall behave, for I am quite at a loss--Let old Sarah come by all Means-- I am,

Dear Mamma, Your most Dutiful Daughter, Syrena Tricksy.


The Answer to these two Letters came to her on Wednesday Morning by old Sarah, as she had desired, and contained as follows.


WEDNESDAY Morning.

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Dear Child, I Received your Letters, and am very much surprized to find you have gone so far in a Love Intrigue, in so short a Time: I perceive nothing, however, to condemn in your Behaviour hitherto--your Refusal of the Stockings, your giving him an Opportunity to speak to you a second Time, and the Confusion you affected were all perfectly right; but I am a little angry that you so readily believe what he says, and seem assured of his Affection-- I doubt not, but he likes you, but my Girl there is a wide Difference between Love and Likeing; the chief aim of the one is to make the beloved Object happy: That of the other, only to gratify itself. --Now your Business is by an artful Management to bring this Likeing up to Love, and then it will be in your power to do with him as you please. --But after all, I am afraid he is not worth taking much pains about--if he be only an Officer, as I quess by his Cockade, 'tis not in his Power to make you any Settlement as a Mistress --and as a Wife; when Children come, what is a Commission! --Or what a Pension to the Widow, left perhaps in an advanced Age, when 'tis out of one's power to mend one's Fortune any way. --No, Child! 'Tis your Business to make Hay while the Sun shines--for when Youth and Beauty are no more--Farewel Hope--I could wish notwithstanding you knew his Name, and what Family he is of. He may be born to an Estate, and if so, his Passion must be cultivated. --It won't therefore be improper to give him the meeting to-night, but continue your Shyness; yet so as to give him some little Encouragement too, that you may the easier get out of him what he is; for there is no advising you how to proceed till we know that. --Besure you write me a full Account of what passes between you, on Thursday Morning; and if you come on Sunday, shall then give you Instructions suitable to the Occasion. --I hope you do not stand in need of any Caution against indulging a secret Inclination for him; for if it once comes to that you are ruin'd! --No Woman ever made her Fortune by the Man she had a sincere Value for. --Depend upon it in a little time you will see finer Gentlemen than he, be he as fine as he will--let your own Interest be your only Aim--think of nothing, but how to be fine yourself; and by keeping in that Mind you will be happy, and also make so,

Your Affectionate Mother, Ann Tricksy.

P. S. I charge you not to be prevail'd upon to go into any House with him--I don't like his asking you to go into the Tavern.


Syrena was rejoiced to find by this, that her Mother approved of her keeping the Assignation, and had before prepared an Excuse to her Mistress for going out --Her Lover had detain'd her so long on Monday, that she was oblig'd to say when she came home, that in stepping out to buy a few Apples, she had met with a Relation who was very glad to see her, and to hear she was so well put out; and added, that she had bid her come to see her on Wednesday in the Afternoon, for she had something to make her a Present of. Well, said Mrs. Martin, to whom all this was spoke; I'll prevail on my Sister to give you leave, for 'tis pity you should lose any thing for not going for it. The good Gentlewoman performed her Promise, little suspecting the Truth, and Syrena put a handsome Paris Cap in her Pocket, which at her Return, she pretended had been given her by her Cousin; but in what Manner she had in reality been engaged, she gave her Mother a faithful Account of, the next Morning, in these Words.


Thursday Morning.

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Dear Mamma, Having your Permission I went at the appointed time, which was Four o'Clock, to the Church-Yard. --My Gentleman was there before me, and his Eyes sparkled with Joy as soon as he saw me coming: He ran to meet me; my dear Angel said he, the Place we are in will not permit me to throw myself at your Feet, as I ought to do, to thank you for this Favour; but be assured, my Heart is more your Slave than ever by this Goodness. Sir, I have been taught, answer'd I, that to be guilty of a breach of Promise, is the worst thing almost that a Person can be guilty of, so have always been careful to avoid that Fault with every Body. But may I not hope, returned he, that you make some Distinction between me and others, and that I owe this Blessing to something more than meerly a Punctilio of Honour. --I wish, Sir, said I, that I have not given you too much Cause to think so; for as the Promise I made you was upon a sort of Compulsion, I might have dispensed with it. This I spoke, Mamma, in a more tender Air than ever I had done before; in Hopes by seeming open and unguarded to him, he might in reality be so to me; and indeed it answer'd my Expectation, for on my representing the Hazard I run in my Reputation, for meeting by Appointment with a Gentleman, who was a perfect Stranger to me, he readily told me his Name was Vardine, that he was of French Extraction, and his Parents among those who quitted their Estates and Country for the Sake of Religion; and that they being dead, a Person of Quality, but who he did not mention, had been so good to procure him a Commission in the Army: He concluded this Narrative of himself with telling me, he expected to be preferr'd, for at present he was only a Lieutenant; and that if I could once be brought to love him, he would make me a happy Woman. --I thought of you then, Mamma, and how lucky it was for me, that I had not set my Heart upon him. --I took no Notice however of the Baulk it was to me, but seem'd very civil and obliging. --He press'd me again to go and take a Glass of Wine with him, but I absolutely refused that; however, being afraid somebody might happen to come through the Church-yard that might know me, we cross'd, at my Request, the Garden, and struck down Southampton-street, and so into the Savoy, where we walk'd about an Hour: he all the time entertaining me with Praises of my Beauty, and the Impression it had made on him. Indeed I staid with him more to accustom myself to hear fine things said to me, and to practice an agreeable manner of receiving them, than any thing else--for as you say, Mamma, he is neither fit to make either Husband or Gallant to one in my Circumstances; so I am resolv'd to think no more on him. --I am a little vex'd tho' now, that I did not take the Stockings, for as there is nothing to be done with him, 'twould have been clear Gains; but I did not know then, his fine Cloaths deceiv'd me; and methinks I am sorry he has not an Estate, for he has Wit at Will, and I am sure loves me to Distraction; and so you would say, if you heard him as I have done--but that's nothing to the Purpose--let him love on--I shall trouble my Head no more about him, but wait with Patience 'till something offers more to my Advantage. --He wou'd fain have exacted another Promise to meet him again; but I told him it was not in my power, if even I had an Inclination, I was much so confined; and if ever he had an Opportunity of speaking to me again, it must be Chance that gave it him. --He complain'd bitterly of my Cruelty; but I was not to be persuaded, and left him as much mortified as the Account he had given me of himself had made me. --I shall see you on Sunday, and if any Thing should happen before, then, shall not fail to let you know it--till then I am,

Dear Mamma, Your Dutiful, but Disappointed Daughter, Syrena Tricksy.


Hitherto Syrena had disguised nothing either of her Behaviour or Sentiments from her Mother; but a very little Time made her alter her Conduct in that Point, and practice on her some of those Lessons of Deceit, she had so well instructed her in. Friday in the Afternoon, as she was sitting at Work, old Sarah came in: She was surpris'd to see her, and ask'd hastily if her Mamma was well. Yes, Miss, said Sarah, very well; but hearing me say, I was coming this way, she desired me to call and give you her Blessing, with these three Yards and a half of Dimitty; she says, if your Mistress will be so good to cut it out, and give you leave to run it up at a leisure Time, it will serve you in a Morning to comb your Head and wash in, and save your other Cloaths; as she deliver'd this Message, she gave her the Bundle, and at the same time slipt a Letter into her Hand unperceiv'd by any Body. The Mistress who was present, said Mrs. Tricksy was a very good Mother; and she might be sure, the Girl should find time to make her Gown very soon. Sarah then told her, they hoped to see her on Sunday, which the other promised, and the old Emissary went away.

Syrena could not imagine the reason of her Mother's writing again, when she expected to see her so soon, and as she thought had no farther Advice to give her, concerning the Lieutenant; being full of Impatience to see what it contain'd, she soon made a pretence for going out of the Room, and read these Lines.


FRIDAY Noon.

Table of Contents

Dear Child, Tho' I hope to see you on Sunday, I could not refrain giving you some Remonstrance, which every Hour's Delay of, may render less effectual. --I have not slept all Night for thinking on some Passages in your Letter. Ah, Syrena! -- Syrena! I am afraid you like this poor idle Fellow, more than it may be you are yet sensible of yourself--why else are you sorry he has not an Estate? --If he has not an Estate others have, that, perhaps, may find you as agreeable as he has done. --You have a very great Opinion too of his Wit, and of his Love; suppose you are not mistaken, he is only the more dangerous, and you ought the less to trust yourself with him. --I charge you, therefore, to shun him henceforward--be as industrious to avoid all Opportunities of seeing him, as 'tis probable he will be in seeking them. --You already believe all the fine Things (as you call them) that he says to you; and knowing by Experience, how susceptible the Heart is at your Years, I tremble least all the Counsel I have given you, should not be sufficient to guard you from the Temptation. --Don't think Child, that I want to lay you under any unreasonable Restraints. -- No, if we were rich and above Censure, I should be far from putting any curb to Nature; but as all our Hopes depend on your making your Fortue, either by Marriage or a Settlement equal to it, you must be extremely cautious of your Character till that Point is gain'd, and when once it is, you may freely indulge your Inclinations with this, or any other Man. --You see, I do not like most Parents, want to deprive you of the Pleasures of Life; I would only have you first attain, that which alone can give them a true Relish; for Love in Rags Syrena, is a most despicable Thing. Therefore, I once more lay my Commands upon you, to speak no more to this paltry Vardine; and to endeavour with all your Might, to conquer whatever Sentiments you may be possest of in his Favour, which is all that can restore Peace of Mind to her, who is at present,

Your most discontented Mother, Ann Tricksy.

P. S. Come as early as you can on Sunday.

Syrena was not very well pleas'd at the Contents of this Letter: She thought there was no Occasion for this Caution; and that she had said enough to convince her Mother, that she had no regard for any Thing in Competition with her Interest. --Why then, said she, must I be debarr'd from speaking to a Man that loves me? A little Conversation with him sometimes would certainly instruct me better how to behave to the Sex, than a thousand Lessons--besides, I might get some small Presents from him--but she will needs have it that I am in love, forsooth. --Not I, indeed, I did not care if he was hang'd for that Matter; but there is something pleasingly amusing, in being address'd by a Man that admires one, and can talk well--in the insipid Life I lead here, 'tis necessary I should have some Diversion to keep up my Spirits. --She owns my Conduct has been perfectly right hitherto--why then should it not be so still?-- why must I run away whenever I see him, as if I were afraid he would devour me? Indeed, I shan't make myself such a Fool-- if Fortune or his own Endeavours throw him in my way, I shall hear what he has to say, and it may be manage, so as to get something of him--poor as she thinks him.

Thus did Vanity, Self-Conceit and Avarice, tempt her to despise the Admonitions of her crafty Mother, and make her resolve to act henceforward of herself.

When Sunday Morning came, as she stood drawing on her Gloves at the Window, she saw him at his ready drest; she presently imagin'd he was ready so early, for no other Reason than to watch her going abroad; but she had not indulg'd herself with this Idea above three Minutes, before it was entirely dash'd: He took up his Hat and Cane and went out of Doors, without so much as looking up. --Ha! cryed she in a Pet, is it so--you are strangely alter'd methinks. --Mamma, need not have been so fearful. The Coldness of my Behaviour last time, has certainly made him resolve to give over all Thoughts of me.