John O. Meusebach

Answer to Interrogatories

Published by Good Press, 2021
goodpress@okpublishing.info
EAN 4064066442255

Table of Contents


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Titlepage
ANSWER TO INTERROGATORIES.
ERRATA.

Answer to Interrogatories

Table of Contents

IN CASE NO. 396,

MARY C. PASCHAL ET AL.

vs.

THEODORE EVANS,

DISTRICT COURT OF McCULLOUCH COUNTY, TEXAS

NOVEMBER TERM, 1893.

By JOHN O. MEUSEBACH


COPYRIGHTED, 1894


AUSTIN, TEXAS

PEMBERTON PRESS

No.1 Pemberton Parkway

Reprinted 1964


ANSWER TO INTERROGATORIES.

Table of Contents

Interrogatory No. 1:—What is your name, age, residence and nativity; and if you state that you now live in Mason county, Texas, then state how long you have lived there and how long have you been in Texas?

Answer to Interogatory No. 1:—My name is John O. Meusebach, as naturalized in Texas in 1845. Became a citizen of the United States by annexation. My age is 81½ years; residence Loyal Valley, Mason county, Texas. Nativity, kingdom of Prussia. Lived in Loyal Valley since 1869, and in Texas since 1845. Since 1869 I have been ruined three times by elementary forces, by water, tornado, and fire; three times by accidents, by breaking left foot, right arm, and by rupture, and a periodical swelling of feet makes it impossible for me to leave my house or room since about two years. I mention these personalities in order to explain why I cannot hunt up testimony or documents outside of my house, nor trust to my memory with absolute certainty as to facts and events which happened nearly half a century ago. Still I base my answer to interrogatories mostly on such printed or other documents, which I consider official, so far as I could get hold of them. If incomplete, the fault must be ascribed to circumstances, if incorrect, the authors are responsible.

Interrpgatory No. 2:—Do you know anything about the German Emigration Company? If yes, state all you know about its origin, its existence, and its connections with Fisher's and Miller's Colony. Give history of it, with dates, as near as you can, and give the different names by which said company was known.

Asnwer to Interrogatory No. 2:—I know something about the German Emigration Company.

ITS ORIGIN

In 1842, a company, at first small in members and means, excited by the glorious achievements of the young Republic of Texas, and the glowing descriptions of its beautiful climate, fertile lands, and other resources, had been organized in Germany and had sent two of its members to Texas, in order to ascertain the truth and to report whether the country was a favorable field of operation for emigration on a large scale, or for financial speculation in lands on a small scale only.

The reports from Texas being favorable, and an additional number of shareholders with ample means having been secured, it was concluded at a general meeting to drop the idea of financial speculation and to organize as an association with the avowed purpose of aiding and leading the emigration to Texas on a large scale, and to carry the operations on a basis of philanthropical principles, excluding all political or money-making financial projects.

(See notice signed officially by Count Castell, leading director of the company, dated May 11, 1845, and printed in "the German settlements of Texas."—Bonn, 1845, page 4.)

Under the name of "The Association for the Protection of German Emigrants to Texas;"

Subsequentlv known as "The German Emigration Company;"

This company being mostly composed of princes and noblemen, was definitely organized and chartered in the Dukedom of Nassau, May 3, 1844.—(See White, page 3.)

The company—its members being neither business men nor financiers—fell an easy prey into the hands of shrewd land speculators. At first, a speculative Frenchman, Bourgeois d'Orvanne, having heard of the intentions of the company, and being in possession of a so-called grant-concession in Western Texas, offered it for sale. Head over heels his offer was accepted, notwithstanding that his contract showed on its face that it was already forfeited, but probably under the condition that an extension of time could be obtained from Congress of Texas.

In April, 1844, Prince Solms was appointed trustee and general agent, and Bourgeois d'Orvanne as colonial director, and both started in May for Texas, for the purpose of making the necessary arrangements for the reception of the emigrants to be shipped in the fall of 1844, and for the transportation and settlement of the same on their lands. (See page 27 Coll. Doc, 1845, and White's brief, p. 4.)